Nasbami

Nasbami or Nazif Lopulissa is a Rotterdam based artist who graduated the Willem de Kooning Academy in 2016. His vibrant, colorful and playful style is always meticulously matched with his eye for high impact and high quality.

Hi, where do you live / where are you from?

Hi, I'm currently living in the city of Rotterdam but was born and raised in Tiel, a small city right in the middle of the country.

How does this place influence you as an artist?

My first day at the art academy was also my first day in Rotterdam. I just got rejected on two other academies and then started signing in on all others in the Netherlands.

Last minute I was selected by the Willem de Kooning Academy and I went there, knowing nothing about the school or the city. I stepped out of the train and followed some one carrying an A1 folder, hoping he would lead me to the academy, which he did thankfully.

So in the beginning the city didn't mean that much to me. The city itself still doesn't really, it's all the people I met and the circle of artists I'm in that inspire my enormously to keep on working and working. I guess you can see that as the Rotterdam mentality.

What are your finest moment?

Well, this Rotterdam mentality also I meant I was literally always working in the beginning; working 'til midnight because that was the thing to do. Until I figured out that this was actually counter productive for me.

So now I wake up early, prepare myself a big breakfast and start working, these are the moments I enjoy the most.

And your worst?

When I'm hungry. Or when I do force myself to work until midnight again, without being productive.

How do you start working on a new illustration or artwork?

I always have been experimenting a lot. So I think of something I want to create and then start thinking of all possible solutions of how to achieve this goal.

These can be different media, materials, paints, prints, whatever serves the purpose best.

Unfortunately, this also makes that the path towards creating this narrative is usually more exciting then finishing the actual work. I do finish them, but mostly I'm straight away annoyed by the result. Making mistakes puts me onto another path, a path on which I want to continue instead of stepping of and finishing that particular artwork.

Can you explain a bit more about this path your following?

Yeah, for instance two years ago I decided that from then on I would only sketch with fineliners instead of pencils. This means I can't use any erasers and that every misstep has to lead to a new approach to the illustration I'm making.

This has forced me to go from erasing and erasing lines I didn't like, to exploring these lines and create a lot more diversity in my palate of forms and shapes. I hope you understand what I mean.

Nasbami